Tag Archive | jack

Momma’s Sweet Jack BBQ Sauce

Momma’s Sweet Jack Sauce

Garrett’s Momma’s Sweet Jack Sauce
Unlike men in the house, I can’t handle a lot of “hot” foods. So Gary decided to try his hand at making a home-made mild sweet bar-b-que sauce just for me.

We had gone to a local steak house in Virginia who serve their own version of a Jack Daniels bbq sauce. It was nice, but way to hot for me. I was fairly disappointed, because it truly smelled so GOOD. That inspired Gary to make a new sauce.

It goes great on chicken, beef and everything in between!

Preparation Time: 1¼ hours
Makes a bit less than 12 oz.

Ingredients: Continue reading

Wide Awake Jack Sauce

Wide Awake Jack Sauce

Garrett’s Wide Awake Jack Sauce
During the last holiday season, we gave Gary a book about grilling. It has some wonderful recipes. But it also inspired the Grill Master to try his hand at making some home-made bar-b-que sauces.

I like sweet sauces, the boy child loves hot sauces. And Dad, well he’s fond of tart sauces similar to what you’d find in his home state of North Carolina. Needless to say there has been a lot of experimenting going on in our house on the weekends.

He has been working on this one for a few months now. I think he’s  finally gotten it just right. If you like hot, you’ll like this one.

It goes great on chicken, beef and everything in between!

Preparation Time: 1¼ hours
Makes a bit more than 1 quart

Ingredients: Continue reading

Jack London – Sea Wolf

Sea Wolf by Jack London on Gutenberg

Sea Wolf by Jack London on Gutenberg

American Novelist

Jack London (1876-1916).
The novelist and short-story writer Jack London was, in his lifetime, one of the most popular authors in the world. After World War I his fame was eclipsed in the United States by a new generation of writers, but he remained popular in many other countries, especially in the Soviet Union, for his romantic tales of adventure mixed with elemental struggles for survival.

John Griffith London was born in San Francisco on Jan. 12, 1876. His family was poor, and he was forced to go to work early in life to support himself. At 17 he sailed to Japan and Siberia on a seal-hunting voyage.

He was largely self-taught, reading voluminously in libraries and spending a year at the University of California. In the late 1890s he joined the gold rush to the Klondike. This experience gave him material for his first book, ‘The Son of Wolf’, published in 1900, and for ‘Call of the Wild’ (1903), one of his most popular stories. Continue reading